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There is something comforting about receiving a handwritten note

Susie Watson East Gippsland Image: supplied

VERY few people write letters or notes anymore, so it is a welcome surprise when one arrives in the mail.

There is an instant sense of belonging because someone took the time to sit down and put pen to paper.

Australia Post is helping Australians stay connected by delivering more than four million specifically designed prepaid postcards to rural and remote households as part of its continued focus on mental health.

Head of community at Australia Post, Nicky Tracey, said the simple idea would positively impact people’s mental health, particularly those who are currently unable to visit friends and family.

“We know that when we connect, we feel better, and sometimes a small message can be all it takes to make a big difference to someone you care about,” Ms Tracey said.

“These postcards make it easy to connect with a message of love, hope and support by simply putting a message on the card, addressing it and dropping it in a red post box.”

The cards, created in collaboration with mental health partner Beyond Blue, are divided into two sections.

The first section, listing helpful hints on keeping fit mentally, is for keeping while the other is for writing that note to friends or family and posting free of charge within Australia.

This initiative follows the ‘When we connect, we feel better’ stamp released in 2020.

The stamp was made as a pair so the sender could use one half to mail a letter to a loved one, with the second half placed inside the envelope enabling the recipient to write back quickly.

Beyond Blue CEO Georgie Harman said the joint project helps share important messages about mental health with communities and people who have to deal with the impacts of natural disasters and the pandemic.

“This postcard campaign will help us reach into rural and remote areas, where social and geographic isolation, weather impacts, and difficulty accessing services can present mental health challenges,” Ms Harman said.

“I hope people will join in the spirit of this initiative, read the tips and send a card to a loved one.

“If we keep talking about mental health, we can smash the stigma and remove the barriers that hold people back from seeking support.”

The free postcards are available at participating Post Offices while stocks last.

 They will start to arrive this week in regional letterboxes across the country.

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Carol Saffer

Carol Saffer is an award-winning journalist enthusiastic about creating copy that engages audiences. She is curious by nature, possesses a growth mindset and thrives on new and unusual challenges. Carol has experience as a reporter for various regional Victorian newspapers and writing for Business Day in The Age. Her previous career was in the fashion industry, and she holds post-graduate degrees in business and journalism.

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