Supporting Australia’s most innovative and creative young scientists

Following the tragic news of the passing of Neil Lawrence on Wednesday, July 15, it is with heavy hearts that the Centenary Institute announces that applications for the 2015 Centenary Institute Lawrence Creative Prize are now open. This prize will be held as scheduled, in loving memory of Neil.

The Centenary Institute Lawrence Creative Prize (CILCP) is entering its fifth year as the leading prize for young, creative and innovative Australian scientists. The prize was created in recognition of Neil Lawrence’s invaluable and long-­‐standing contribution to the Centenary Institute over the years, as a Board Member and Chair of the Centenary Institute Medical Research Foundation.

Coined the “Archibald Prize of the young science world”, the CILCP rewards Australia’s best and brightest young scientists for asking the bold questions that others would not think possible – the very essence of Neil Lawrence.

This year, additional to the top three prizes previously awarded, a “People’s Choice Award” has been introduced. The Centenary Institute is calling on the broader Australian community to get involved in the science world and have their say on which innovative young researchers they would like to see supported through this initiative.

In partnership with Thinkable.org, all applicants for this year’s CILCP will be required to upload a video about their research and how they are choosing to take a creative an innovative approach to biomedical science.

The Centenary Institute encourages members of the community to visit Thinkable.org to vote for their favourite applicant or make a contribution to support their research via the crowdfunding capabilities of the site.

Applicants will also be judged by a panel of internationally-­recognised scientists, including Professor Ian Frazer, who is best known for developing the technology behind the HPV vaccine against cervical cancer.

Centenary Institute Executive Director, Professor Mathew Vadas AO, said it is vitally important that we sustain initiatives such as this and continue to encourage young innovative scientists to ask those big questions, ensuring Australia remains a world leader in biomedical research.

“80% of the biggest scientific discoveries for humanity have come from researchers younger than 45 years of age,” Professor Vadas said.

“Over the years, the Centenary Institute Lawrence Creative Prize has supported some of Australia’s finest young researchers, including Professor Geoff Faulkner who looks at DNA in the human brain, and Connie Wong, who is working to prevent early deaths following stroke.

“This is a great opportunity for young scientists right across the country to showcase their research to some of the world’s leading scientists, as well as the broader Australian community.”

Applications for the CILCP are now open at https://thinkable.org/competition/12

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Ryan Fritz

Ryan Fritz started The Advocate in 2014 to provide not-for-profits and charities with another media platform to tell their worthwhile hard news stories and opinion pieces effortlessly. In 2020, Ryan formed a team of volunteer journalists to help spread even more high-quality stories from the third sector. He also has over 10 years of experience as a media and communications professional for not-for-profits and charities.

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