Recovery continues for Solomons

A YEAR after a tsunami swept through one of the most remote areas of Solomon Islands, recovery work is continuing World Vision Australia said today.

The magnitude-8 earthquake and tsunami that struck on February 6, 2013 affected 23 communities, damaging housing, water sources, health clinics, schools and roads.

World Vision’s Country Director for Solomon Islands, Andrew Catford said that World Vision was able to respond to immediate need in the aftermath of the disaster and was continuing to support the recovery through on-going projects on Santa Cruz Island in the eastern province of Temotu.

“In the two months after the disaster hit, World Vision in partnership with the National Disaster Management Office was able to help more than 6,500 people, almost two-thirds of Santa Cruz’s population, with relief distributions of food, water and shelter,” Mr Catford said.

World Vision was appointed the co-ordinating body for the Temotu Tsunami response by the Government of the Solomon Islands to distribute relief items to affected communities.

“World Vision’s disaster response continues with projects rehabilitating the water supply and sanitation of affected communities.”

World Vision is also implementing relief and long term recovery projects to help families get their lives back to normal. Projects focus on children’s development and protection, providing access to clean water and improving hygiene practices, and establishing an Emergency Radio project to assist with sharing relevant recovery information.

“Recovery work will finish up by the end of 2014. However, long-term development projects will continue in the province, with World Vision’s commitment to the people of Temotu spanning at least 15 years,” Mr Catford said.

World Vision has been working in Temotu home to around 20,000 since 2002. It is one of the most remote provinces in Solomon Islands and has one of the highest levels of poverty in the country. The province is particularly vulnerable to disasters. World Vision has run disaster preparedness workshops with communities, as part of its Disaster Risk Reduction project in Solomon Islands.

Source: World Vision Australia

Ryan Fritz

Ryan Fritz started The Advocate in 2014 to provide not-for-profits and charities another media platform to tell their worthwhile hard news stories and opinion pieces effortlessly. In 2020, Ryan formed a team of volunteer journalists to help spread even more high-quality stories from the third sector. He also has over 10 years experience as a media and communications professional for not-for-profits and charities and currently works at Redkite, a childhood cancer charity.

LET’S KEEP

IN TOUCH!

We’re sorry!

We hate annoying pop-up windows too,

but before you hit the x button, please

take three seconds and subscribe to our

website for free. We’re a team of

dedicated volunteer journalists and

we’d really appreciate your support by

supporting us by subscribing below. 

We don’t spam! Read our privacy policy for more info.

Ryan Fritz

Ryan Fritz started The Advocate in 2014 to provide not-for-profits and charities with another media platform to tell their worthwhile hard news stories and opinion pieces effortlessly. In 2020, Ryan formed a team of volunteer journalists to help spread even more high-quality stories from the third sector. He also has over 10 years of experience as a media and communications professional for not-for-profits and charities.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

LET’S KEEP

IN TOUCH!

We’re sorry!

We hate annoying pop-up windows too,

but before you hit the x button, please

take three seconds and subscribe to our

website for free. We’re a team of

dedicated volunteer journalists and

we’d really appreciate your support by

supporting us by subscribing below. 

We don’t spam! Read our privacy policy for more info.