Early detection program needed to reduce our No.1 killer

THE National Heart Foundation of Australia has today renewed their call for greater action to prevent cardiovascular disease in Australia after new research shows it is the underlying cause of 31 per cent of all deaths in Australia.

The report, Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease – Australian Facts: Mortality[#_edn1][i] released today by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare shows that cardiovascular disease, which includes heart disease and stroke, remains the most common cause of death in Australia.

The Heart Foundation’s National CEO, Mary Barry said this report highlights the need for early detection of the risk of developing heart disease, stroke, chronic kidney disease or type 2 diabetes – called an integrated health check.
“This report confirms the need for a nationally consistent integrated health check that will detect those at risk before a life-threatening emergency strikes,” said Ms Barry.
“We have well-developed Government endorsed guidelines for GPs to assess cardiovascular disease risk, but these assessments are not routinely done. We need the Federal Government to implement a nationally consistent program.”
“The sooner GPs routinely offer an integrated health check, the earlier they can act to prevent a life-threatening event.”

The report shows that together cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease killed almost 53,000 Australians each year. The data also showed that:

– Cardiovascular disease contributed to 56% of all deaths.
– Death rates were higher among older persons
– Higher death rates were reported among people in low socio-economic groups, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders and those living in remote areas.

“A modest government investment in early detection and treatment will reduce incidence of Australia’s biggest chronic disease killers and the demand they place on our health system,” Ms Barry added.
“All Australians aged 45 over, or 35 or over if you are an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, should ask their doctor for an integrated health check.

“An integrated health check is the best way to find out your risk of having a heart attack by taking into account all risk factors, instead of each one individually.”

Ryan Fritz

Ryan Fritz started The Advocate in 2014 to provide not-for-profits and charities another media platform to tell their worthwhile hard news stories and opinion pieces effortlessly. In 2020, Ryan formed a team of volunteer journalists to help spread even more high-quality stories from the third sector. He also has over 10 years experience as a media and communications professional for not-for-profits and charities and currently works at Redkite, a childhood cancer charity.

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Ryan Fritz

Ryan Fritz started The Advocate in 2014 to provide not-for-profits and charities with another media platform to tell their worthwhile hard news stories and opinion pieces effortlessly. In 2020, Ryan formed a team of volunteer journalists to help spread even more high-quality stories from the third sector. He also has over 10 years of experience as a media and communications professional for not-for-profits and charities.

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