Conservation groups commend the Morrison Government for joining the Global Ocean Alliance

A Giant sea turtle in the Great Barrier Reef (Image Credit: Shutterstock).

The Save Our Marine Life Alliance, Australian Marine Conservation Society and The Pew Charitable Trusts commend the Australian Government for joining an alliance of 40 nations calling for a visionary global target to protect the world’s oceans by 2030. 

Darren Kindleysides, CEO of the Australian Marine Conservation Society said: “Our oceans are critical to life on earth. Oceans across the globe are in deep trouble – loss of habitat, pollution, overfishing, development, invasive species and the very real and immediate impacts of climate change are devastating marine habitats and species. It’s reducing our oceans’ ability to provide food, sustainable livelihoods and protect shorelines and people from extreme weather.”

“There is still time to stop our oceans reaching a tipping point, but it will require global leadership and cooperation. We commend the Government for stepping forward to help lead the charge on a target for ocean protection,” continued Mr Kindleysides. 

Christabel Mitchell, National Campaign Manager of the Save Our Marine Life Alliance, said: “Australia has already made significant progress in this space.”   

“Australia now has the world’s largest area under formal marine protection – almost 40% of our oceans are marine parks. This will continue to be a work in progress and has set our nation up well for the next phase of the endeavour to achieve healthy oceans.”

“Australia has the responsibility to encourage other nations, and help drive the achievement of a visionary, science-based target for marine protection on a global scale,” Ms Mitchell continued.

Michelle Grady, Director of The Pew Charitable Trusts said: “The global cause of ocean protection has a long way to go. Less than 10% of the world’s oceans are protected, with most of that found close to shore. On the High Seas where much of the world’s big fish and giant marine wildlife roam and feed, there is next to no protection in place.”

“Ocean health is a global issue – it’s in Australia’s interests to actively encourage other nations to take the steps we have taken in our own waters,” Ms Grady concluded.

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