Australia needs to be held accountable for pledge to end extreme poverty: CARE

Image Credit: CARE Australia.

CARE Australia has welcomed Australia’s commitment to new global goals aimed at ending extreme poverty in the next 15 years.

But the humanitarian aid agency warns progress will be limited without increased commitment from leaders across political, private and development sectors.

“This is the most ambitious blueprint ever created for reducing poverty and inequality while fighting climate change,” said CARE Australia chief executive Dr Julia Newton-Howes.

“But the real test will be ahead when it comes to financing, implementing and holding governments accountable to the goals.”

Dr Newton-Howes said the change in leadership in Canberra, coupled with the announcement in New York, provided an opportunity for Australia to re-think its approach to Australian aid.

“At a time when Australia is committing itself to new goals that seek to end extreme poverty, we are simultaneously dealing with the biggest aid cuts the country has ever seen,” Dr Newton-Howes said.

“Australia’s aid budget grew steadily after the Millennium Development Goals, MDGs, were introduced in 2000. But now, when new global commitments are being made, we face the biggest aid cuts in Australia’s history.

“If Australia is serious about committing to the SDGs, the government will have to reinvest in Australian aid.”

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) will replace the expiring Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), which were set in 2000.

The 17 new goals, which have 169 specific targets, apply to all countries and cover a wide-raging agenda, from fighting inequality to responding to climate change.

CARE Australia has praised world leaders for agreeing to stand-alone goals to tackle gender equality and climate change.

“This result was far from guaranteed. These commitments recognise the significant role both issues play in achieving sustainable development,” Dr Newton-Howes said.

CARE Australia is an international humanitarian aid organisation fighting poverty, with a special focus on working with women and girls to bring lasting change to their communities. www.care.org.au.

Ryan Fritz

Ryan Fritz started The Advocate in 2014 to provide not-for-profits and charities another media platform to tell their worthwhile hard news stories and opinion pieces effortlessly. In 2020, Ryan formed a team of volunteer journalists to help spread even more high-quality stories from the third sector. He also has over 10 years experience as a media and communications professional for not-for-profits and charities and currently works at Redkite, a childhood cancer charity.

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Ryan Fritz started The Advocate in 2014 to provide not-for-profits and charities with another media platform to tell their worthwhile hard news stories and opinion pieces effortlessly. In 2020, Ryan formed a team of volunteer journalists to help spread even more high-quality stories from the third sector. He also has over 10 years of experience as a media and communications professional for not-for-profits and charities.

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