LATEST NEWS

Number of Australians living with blood cancer to more than double
The Advocate

Twenty Australian children, adults, parents and grandparents are losing their lives every day as blood cancer becomes one of the nation’s most diagnosed and deadly killers.

Sadly, that number is projected to more than double by 2035, and around 186,000 Australians could lose their lives to the disease in the…

Heart health warning as Australians face smoke haze
The Advocate

Heart Foundation Chief Medical Adviser, cardiologist Professor Garry Jennings, said bushfire smoke contains harmful gases such as carbon monoxide, and very small particles that can penetrate deep into the lungs.

Professor Jennings said if smoke particles cross from the lungs into the bloodstream, it can contribute to inflammation and narrowing…

Beyond Blue welcomes Federal Government’s initial mental health response to bushfires crisis
The Advocate

Beyond Blue welcomes the Commonwealth’s announcement yesterday of $76 million for immediate mental health support for anyone affected by the Australian bushfire crisis.

The package particularly targets affected individuals and communities in bushfire affected areas, and firefighters and emergency services personnel including volunteers.

Measures include on-the-ground counselling and support in affected…

3 [post-views]view 6 mins
The Advocate
Twenty Australian children, adults, parents and grandparents are losing their lives every day as blood cancer becomes one of the nation’s most diagnosed and deadly killers, reports the Leukaemia Foundation on World Cancer Day.

Twenty Australian children, adults, parents and grandparents are losing their lives every day as blood cancer becomes one of the nation’s most diagnosed and deadly killers.

Sadly, that number is projected to more than double by 2035, and around 186,000 Australians could lose their lives to the disease in the next 15 years, according to the Leukaemia Foundation’s recently released State of the Nation: Blood Cancer in Australia report.

Today, on World Cancer Day, Leukaemia Foundation CEO Bill Petch has launched the annual World’s Greatest Shave campaign urging Australians to continue to support the fight against blood cancer as the organisation prepares for a massive jump in demand for its services and begins paving the way for a new national, collaborative approach to help save the lives of Australians fighting the disease.

“The first of its kind, State of the Nation report looks at the impact of blood cancers across the country and provides evidence showing that blood cancers are also under-reported,” Mr Petch said.

“We now know that the true size, scale and impact of blood cancer in Australia has been significantly underestimated, potentially leading to inconsistency and inadequacy of funding and service delivery.”

The State of the Nation: Blood Cancer in Australia report shows that not only is there an urgent call to better meet the needs of those currently living with blood cancer, but that demand on support services is going to grow substantially in the next 15 years.

Every day, 41 Australians will be told they have blood cancer and 110,000 Australians are currently living with the disease. According…

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Seymour local gearing up support for hay convoy for fire-affected farmers in Corryong
The Advocate

FUNDRAISING farmer Matt Aldridge is gearing up local support in an inspiring effort to organise a much-needed hay convoy to assist fire-affected farmers who have suffered during the catastrophic bushfires.

Matt, a cattle farmer from Northwood just outside of Seymour, is well-known around the region for founding his charity, The…

Pink Test to raise much-needed funds for breast cancer nurses
The Advocate

THE Sydney Cricket Ground is awash in pink for the twelfth Domain Pink Test in support of the McGrath Foundation, which started today, January 3, 2020.

Now in its twelfth year, the Pink Test is one of the largest sporting fundraising initiative in Australia where the cricket community, both on…

Veterans and farmers to trek Kokoda track for mental health
The Advocate

UP to 12 Australian veterans and farmers are aiming to walk in the footsteps of Australian heroes to raise funds and awareness of post-traumatic stress syndrome and depression.

Matt Aldridge, a farmer from Seymour, is also the founder of The Coo-Wee Ride, a charity who has raised thousands of dollars…